"NAT" tag

Write Your Own conio.h for GNU/Linux

Here’s a close look at the technique and code for console handling in Standard (i.e., ISO/ANSI) C/C++.   In the latter part of the article readers are encouraged to write their own code for…

Manage Your Routine Tasks With Jenkins

This article shows how to set up Jenkins for email-notification, and build set-up on Linux- fedora core. In a software project life cycle, we are continuously integrating software on the version control, and…

Switching to IPv6? Here are Some Must-Try Options!

It is practically impossible and not particularly desirable to replace all your existing computing and networking equipment with IPv6 equipment at once. But what is expected from IT managers today is that when…

Marching packets

Cyber Attacks Explained: Packet Spoofing

Last month, we started this series to cover the important cyber attacks that impact critical IT infrastructure in organisations. The first was the denial-of-service attack, which we discussed in detail. This month, we…

Linux Virtualisation Roundup

VMWare Player, VirtualBox, KVM: Finding Virtualisation Software that Fits

This article is intended to guide users in choosing the best virtualisation solution for themselves. According to Wikipedia: “Virtualisation, in computing, is the creation of a virtual (rather than actual) version of something,…

Securing Database Servers

Securing Database Servers

With the ever-expanding data requirements for Web applications, database administrators often configure security parameters at the OS and database layer. Unfortunately, administrators seldom consider implementing security at a network layer to protect the…

Android and SSH

Accessing a Home Laptop Remotely from Android

Consider this: You’re on vacation in the Maldives, when your office calls, with an urgent request for some files and information. These happen to be on your laptop, which is at home! If…

Building a Server from Scratch, Part 2: Firewalls, Port Forwarding, NAT, DHCP & TFTP

Last month, we built a server using off-the-shelf hardware. This time, let’s set up some essential server services.

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