"RHEL" tag

Test Your Troubleshooting Skills With Trouble-Maker

Trouble-Maker, as the name suggests, is a Linux tool that, when installed in a system, randomly selects a problem from its list and actually creates it on the system. The idea behind using…

Setting Up OpenAM for Web Authentication

OpenAM provides a system for integrating diverse Web applications-to share common authentication and authorisation systems. It can protect applications running on any Web or application server. With a centralised login for all applications,…

Deploy a DNS Server in a Secure Way

BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) is one of the more widely used DNS servers. This article guides readers on how to deploy a BIND DNS server in a secure way by implementing three…

A section of the Just Dial office at Chennai

Leading Local Search Engine (Just) Dials Open Source for a Growth Call!

Open source technology enabled Just Dial, India’s leading local search engine, to grow at a much faster rate and achieve a lot more than it planned for. Every business that signs on to…

Paul Frields on Fedora 12 and Beyond

Two months after the launch of Fedora 12, we spoke to Paul Frields, Fedora Project Leader at Red Hat, about how this release has been received by the community, and what is in store for the next. Though it started as a technical discussion on what Fedora 12 offers IT admins and developers, it graduated into a more serious conversation on the relationship between Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and the distinction (if any) between commercial and community Linux.

The Art of Guard, Part 5: SELinux Logging

In the previous article in this series, we looked at allow rules in an SELinux policy. This month we’ll discuss SELinux error logs in order to decipher them and take corrective action.

CentOS 5.3: A Blue Feather In Your Red Hat

While everyone else seems to be in a race for the latest and the greatest, CentOS 5.3 still bundles pretty old and tested software. Well, this is not your typical desktop OS; besides, the stability makes it a must-have for your server deployments.

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