"synchronisation" tag

A Few Things You Should Know About Futexes

This article aims to provide a clear and concise discussion about the basics of futexes, and how they could be used to implement user-space synchronisation mechanisms on Linux. So what are futexes? They…

Your ownCloud

ownCloud 3 Makes Setting up and Accessing Your Own Cloud Dead Easy

We are all aware that storing data in the cloud has its own advantages, making our data available everywhere we go. But storing our personal data on someone else’s server might lead to…

Time to rsync

Backups and More with rsync

Learn how to use this powerful utility that almost all experts use in their day-to-day work, to perform tasks like back-ups, and much more. The rsync utility can be used cross-platform—Linux, Mac OS…

Software transactional memory

CodeSport (February 2011)

Welcome to CodeSport! We will continue the discussion that began last month about software transactional memory. The main difference between traditional lock-based synchronisation and software transactional memory is that lock-based synchronisation is based…

Concept of transactional memory

CodeSport (January 2011)

Welcome to this month’s CodeSport, in which we discuss the concept of transactional memory, with a focus on software transactional memory. In last month’s column, we featured a bunch of questions on operating…

Keep things synchronised

Keep Your Data Synchronised Across Desktops and Online Services with GNOME Conduit

GNOME Conduit, a synchronisation tool for the GNOME desktop, enables users to synchronise email, files, bookmarks, photos, contacts, and personal information, with another computer, Web-based service or an electronic device. This article provides…

Question bank

CodeSport (September 2010)

Welcome to CodeSport. This month, we feature a medley of questions about operating systems, computer architecture and algorithms. Last month’s column featured three questions on mutual exclusion, the memory consistency model and synchronisation….

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