Duke Energy, Avista to Develop Open Source Software for Utility Smart Grid Platforms

0
1356

The companies claimed that it is the first time utilities have worked together to create open source software for utility smart grid platforms.

Duke Energy and Avista Development, a subsidiary of Avista Corp. based in Spokane, Wash., have joined hands to develop open source software for grid edge technology solutions through an investment in Open Energy Solutions Inc. (OES).

The software will use interoperability concepts and distributed intelligence, allowing utilities to more efficiently integrate, coordinate and optimize diverse assets, the companies said in a written statement.

This includes the energy grid, traditional and renewable generation, customer assets and more, it added.

OES, based in Santa Clara, Calif., was founded by the ITOCHU Corporation of Japan and has been instrumental in supporting and accelerating the implementation of work undertaken by Duke’s Emerging Technology Office.

OES will make the software available to users in an open source format, which the companies said would facilitate widespread adoption and support for the software as utilities make upgrades to the energy grid.

However, the release date for the new open software has not been set yet.

More than 40 utilities showed interest

The companies claimed that it is the first time utilities have worked together to create open source software for utility smart grid platforms.

Duke and its partners organized several meetings during 2018 to get support for the idea and more than 40 utilities showed interest, including APS, Arizona’s largest electric company, and Xcel Energy, which provides power to eight Western and Midwestern states.

“Our industry has been in proprietary mode for many years and it has worked well for us,” Jason Handley, Duke Energy’s director of Smart Grid Emerging Technology and Operations, told Daily Energy Insider.

“What we’re seeing now with the advent of technology and the speed our industry is changing – there’s a need to look at other opportunities. Open source is definitely one of them where we can be more adaptable and flexible,” Handley added.

It is estimated that hydro and solar account for seven percent of Duke’s owned capacity along with nearly 3,000 megawatts of wind and solar on the commercial side. The company is hoping that the new alliance will keep things moving along that same path.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here