Servers
Understanding the OpenLDAP schema

OpenLDAP, Part 3: Understanding the LDAP Schema

In this article, we will explore LDAP concepts such as schema, ObjectClasses and attributes — these will help us build an LDAP server capable of authenticating Linux users. To understand ACLs and LDAP…

OpenLDAP security

OpenLDAP, Part 2: Adding Basic Security Measures

In the second part of the series on OpenLDAP, we’ll cover rootdn password encryption with slappasswd, understand slapd.conf file structure, disable anonymous directory reads, and ACLs (access controls). In Part 1, we had…

Getting started with OpenLDAP

OpenLDAP, Part 1: Setting Up the Directory Server

Let us begin this series on LDAP by setting up OpenLDAP on our machines and unravelling its mysteries as the series progresses. OpenLDAP is the open source implementation of the LDAP protocol to…

Containing Linux Instances with OpenVZ

Understanding the OpenVZ way of virtualisation and getting started with it.

Building a Server from Scratch, Part 4: Pages Full of Data

In the Part 4 of “Building a Server from Scratch” series, we learn how to set up a Web and database server.

Building a Server from Scratch, Part 3: Virtualising the Server

In the Part 3 of “Building a Server from Scratch” series, we learn to set up VirtualBox on the main server and deploy each service on a separate virtual machine.

Building A Highly Available Nginx Reverse-Proxy Using Heartbeat

Last month we discussed how to set up a highly available cluster of Web servers that are load balanced using nginx. One shortcoming in that set-up was the reverse-proxy server itself, which on crashing, will cause the entire Web server cluster to go down. Therefore, we would need to build high-availability in the reverse-proxy server itself.

Building a Server from Scratch, Part 2: Firewalls, Port Forwarding, NAT, DHCP & TFTP

Last month, we built a server using off-the-shelf hardware. This time, let’s set up some essential server services.

KVM: Virtualisation, the Linux Way

KVM, the Kernel Virtual Machine monitor, was announced in late 2006, and was merged in Linus’ tree in December the same year. It has very quickly gained wide acceptance and adoption for being the most promising and capable virtualisation strategy on Linux. Though a very young project, new features are being added at a very brisk pace thanks to the interest taken by several companies and developers across the globe.

GlassFish, Part 2: Getting Started with the App Server

Configure GlassFish, code an application and deploy it on the application server.

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